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2 points by hjek 365 days ago | link | parent

> I did the same thing, about 6 or 7 years ago, that you're doing now. I ported HN to Clojure (which is actually how I learned Clojure).

Cool!

> I needed to centralize the data for the authentication and fnid session info. I think Arc calls them fnids... You probably know better than I do now, but Arc has all this code to expire these session fnids and so, for me, Redis was just a good fit for that task.

The Racket web server is quite "batteries included" and comes with these different managers[0] for dealing with expiration of sessions/continuations, such as the LRU manager:

> The memory limit is set to `memory-threshold` bytes. Continuations start with 24 life points. Life points are deducted at the rate of one every 10 minutes, or one every 5 seconds when the memory limit is exceeded. Hence the maximum life time for a continuation is 4 hours, and the minimum is 2 minutes.

> If the load on the server spikes—as indicated by memory usage—the server will quickly expire continuations, until the memory is back under control. If the load stays low, it will still efficiently expire old continuations.

[0]: https://docs.racket-lang.org/web-server/servlet.html?q=respo...



2 points by i4cu 364 days ago | link

> If the load on the server spikes...

When I was referring to load balancing and centralizing the data I was referring to many web servers sharing a centralized/external source for auth/session data.

I'm unfamiliar with racket's web server 'servlets'. The docs are little unclear (at least to me). Can these servlets live on a separate server so that the data can be shared between web servers? I'm guessing that was/is not a requirement for you, but I'm just interested in knowing if that's how it can work.

Uh oh, you're getting me interested in Racket now. I can't have that... I have too many projects :)

edit: I guess at the end of the day these servlets are web-servers right, so you can, even if you have to do it over http and build an api.

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2 points by hjek 364 days ago | link

> Can these servlets live on a separate server so that the data can be shared between web servers?

Probably. I assume that serializable continuations[0] from stateless servlets can just be stored wherever, like in Redis or something, instead of in the memory of one server.

> I ported HN to Clojure

If that is something you have published, it'd be fun to see, whether it's finished or not.

> Uh oh, you're getting me interested in Racket now.

My impression is that Clojure is faster, less verbose partly due to clever syntax and provides more immutable data structures than Racket. But when it comes to documentation and error messages, I find Racket more coherent and comprehensible.

Say, if I wanted to connect to a SQL databse, with Racket I'd use the DB module[1], end of discussion. But with Clojure there's Korma, ClojureQL, Persist, HoneySQL, Yesql, a JDBC wrapper from Clojure contrib, SQLingvo, oj, Suricatta, aggregate, Hyperion, HugSQL, and probably a few more[2][3]. That multitude of libraries with similar purpose may be useful in some cases, sure, but also potentially a bit overwhelming for beginners, so I guess that's why I found it easier to get started with Racket.

[0]: https://docs.racket-lang.org/web-server/stateless.html#%28pa...

[1]: https://docs.racket-lang.org/db/

[2]: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/294802/use-a-database-wi...

[3]: https://adambard.com/blog/clojure-sql-libs-compared/

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2 points by i4cu 363 days ago | link

> If that is something you have published, it'd be fun to see, whether it's finished or not.

I actually tried to look it out the other day during this conv, but it's buried somewhere unavailable right now. If I find/get to it I'll post.

> That multitude of libraries with similar purpose may be useful in some cases, sure, but also potentially a bit overwhelming for beginners, so I guess that's why I found it easier to get started with Racket.

Agreed. Navigating the volume libraries and the options available is a real pain in the beginning, but once you get past that, then it's not bad at all. At the same time, take a look at the quality of Clojure's Redis Carmine Library vs. Racket's Redis Libraries. Miles apart.

To each their own, right :)

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3 points by hjek 355 days ago | link

> take a look at the quality of Clojure's Redis Carmine Library vs. Racket's Redis Libraries.

Good point.

Anyways, I'm going with SQLite. It's really fast[0] and I just found out about recursive selects[1].

[0]: https://www.sqlite.org/fasterthanfs.html

[1]: https://sqlite.org/lang_with.html

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